WANTED

After having concerns for a position, MarketStar’s recruiting department and the client decided to have me make a poster to post in the client’s local call-center, encouraging employees to refer their friends, family, etc.

I designed the following:

WANTED

MarketStar is looking for a full-time Retail Sales Rep.

  • Drives & closes sales
  • Manages & tracks merch., premiums & collateral
  • Maintains knowledge of tech., products & services

$12/hour + uncapped commission

IF YOU KNOW THIS PERSON

contact Melanie at

MKerbs@MarketStar.com

The position was filled two days later by someone referred by an employee.

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The Link

The Link is MarketStar’s internal blog and magazine used to communicate industry and company information to MarketStar employees. The Fall 2012 edition was released November 2 and contained the following, which I designed, as part of a two page feature on MarketStar’s social media: Pg. 7 – Social Media

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Recruiting Brochure

At the end of the summer of 2012, MarketStar’s recruiting department ran out of brochures to hand out at career fairs. I was tasked with developing a replacement product. With the help of two graphic designers in MarketStar’s marketing department, I produced the following: Recruiting Brochure

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Information Flier

For a career fair in Boston, the organizer of the event asked each employer to submit a flier with general company information to be included in a packet the organizer was providing each registered attendee. I created this informational flier:

marketstar

People & Knowledge Accelerating Sales

MarketStar is an outsourced sales and marketing firm. Founded in 1988, we have more than 2,500 employees in more than 20 different countries around the world.

MarketStar is committed to promoting a positive and productive work culture which attracts top business professionals. Each day, MarketStar’s team manages more than 80,000 commercial accounts, visits more than 1,250 retail stores, interacts with more than 8,000 customers via phone and satisfies our clients’ global needs across six continents. Our sales methods ensure out employees continue a legacy of delivering results on behalf of clients like Verizon for decades to come. In addition to our benefits package, each employee is presented with a predictable career path and the tools necessary to succeed in his or her role.

We recognize our employees are our most valuable asset. To help protect and grow our employee community, we offer a variety of career paths, competitive salaries and benefits. Our comprehensive package of benefits for full-time employees includes multiple medical plans to fit each employee’s needs and circumstances, two dental plan options, comprehensive vision coverage, paid holidays and “floating holidays,” paid personal time off, an employee stock purchase program, 401K matching and more.

Apply

http://www.MarketStar.com

Call

(800) 877-8259

Email

recruiting@marketstar.com

Connect

t @MarketStarJobs

f facebook.com/MarketStarJobs

Because the attending hiring manager representing MarketStar worked specifically with Verizon Communications Inc., we only mentioned that client by name.

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New LinkedIn Tool

Endorse with a Click

This article was originally posted Oct. 16, 2012 by MarketStar’s Careers Blog.

A week ago, I logged on to LinkedIn and noticed something I had not before.

For as long as I have actually been using LinkedIn, I have been able to add skills and expertise. Now I can go to my connections’ skills and with one click endorse them; with one click I can say “Yes, this person is an expert social networker, blogger, copywriter, recruiter, dragon slayer, or whatever.”

This new tool simplifies LinkedIn’s tools to connect and network with professionals. Besides writing a recommendation, you can endorse with a simple click.

As it turns out, there was a good reason I had not noticed it before. It is new. You can find out more by visiting LinkedIn’s blog.

Here is why I brought it up: I asked one of our recruiters if LinkedIn’s recommendations (and now endorsements) are something recruiters look at and if job seekers should seek them.

Andria M. uses LinkedIn when looking for potential candidates. The more a profile is completed, the easier she can help the hiring manager agree to meet with a candidate.

“Job seekers need to develop their LinkedIn profile as much as possible, which includes recommendations and endorsements” she said. “Add contacts, job descriptions and recommendations. Make sure your profile picture helps you look professional.”

She said she does look at a candidate’s recommendations and is interested to see how much the endorsement tool gets used.

So how do you get endorsements and recommendations?

One approach is to ask. Because the endorsement tool is so new, even just asking your connections if they have heard of it or what they know about it might be enough for them to try it out and endorse you.

Another idea is to endorse your connections. I discovered this new tool because one of my connections endorsed me. Since I did not know anything about it, I read up on it and tried it out. I started by endorsing him back. Then LinkedIn offered suggestions of other people I could endorse, which I did.

What about you? Why do you endorse or write recommendations for colleagues? How do you get them in return?

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Good and Better Email Practices for Job Seekers

This article was originally posted Sept. 11, 2012 by MarketStar’s Careers Blog.

We all know there is more than one way to show up for an interview, and some are better than others. The same is true for submitting a resume and subsequently following up in order to get an interview.

There are four kinds of people who look at our website: clients, potential clients, employees, and potential employees. Because each group has varying goals and seeks different information, our website provides contact information for many MarketStar departments.

Anyone can show up for a job interview wearing clean clothes; it would be better if they showed up looking like a business professional. Anyone can email a company’s general information email account; it would be better for job seekers to email recruiting@marketstar.com

When submitting a resume to a company like MarketStar, it is common to feel insecure about your application and feel it might just get lost in the mix. This was certainly true when resumes were submitted on paper. One advantage of the digital application process is recruiters and hiring managers are notified of each new application when they log on to the system.

Some candidates, trying to assure themselves their application has been seen, may choose to email it to anyone whose information they can find on a company’s website. The danger is most executives’ inboxes get cluttered up with hundreds of email every day, so a candidate’s email may not ever be seen. Even if an email is seen, it still may not make it to the right person, since most executives listed on a company’s website are not involved in the recruiting process. Besides, there are much better ways to make a first impression.

If you want to rise above the volume of applicants, you could email your resume to a friend who works in the company and ask them to give you a personal endorsement. It is in their best interest to do so, because if an employee makes a recommendation to the recruiting department, they can earn a $50 dollar bonus after their friend gets hired. If you know a MarketStar employee and want to request an endorsement, remember to email them some specifics, like what position you have applied for and the name of the recruiter you are working with.

The best way to reach a decision maker is to ask the recruiter or hiring manager you are working with about the best person for you to contact. It might not be them, but they know who is in charge of any given position. If you do not have a relationship with a recruiter or hiring manager, send an email to recruiting@marketstar.com to reach the recruiting department directly. When a candidate’s information comes with the endorsement of a recruiter, the candidate is accepted as a potential addition to our employee base.

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Call Me Maybe

Voicemail Tips for Job Applicants

This article was originally posted Aug. 28, 2012 by MarketStar’s Careers Blog.

Whether you are following up on a job application or building a relationship with a client, the phone messages you leave may have an impact on the kind of response you get, or if you get a response at all.

Thad, one of our recruiters, said he sometimes gets phone messages that are so garbled and difficult to understand, he is unable get enough information to call them back.

“At least once or twice a week I get a voicemail message where I can’t understand their name and phone number,” he said. “I know looking for a job can be stressful and you’re just following up, but I can’t call you back or give you the information you’re looking for if I don’t know who you are or how to contact you.”

He said it is important to be concise, speak slowly and make sure there is no background interference. It is a good idea to state your name at the beginning of the message, give the purpose of your call and provide your number, then close by repeating your name and number. If you have an uncommon name, spelling it out helps the person you are calling find your information.

He added if there is one time you want to make sure someone has your information right, it is probably going to be when they want to offer you a job. You can also give the job title and posting number to help the recruiter identity the position you are referring to.

“We each recruit for a dozen positions at any time, so while we might recognize your name, we might not remember which position you applied for,” he said. “And if you haven’t already applied, let us know that too so we don’t go looking for your application only to find you’re not in our system yet.”

Have any tricks on not playing phone tag? Or suggestions on the information you wish people would leave you in a voicemail? Let us know in the comments below.

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