Call Me Maybe

Voicemail Tips for Job Applicants

This article was originally posted Aug. 28, 2012 by MarketStar’s Careers Blog.

Whether you are following up on a job application or building a relationship with a client, the phone messages you leave may have an impact on the kind of response you get, or if you get a response at all.

Thad, one of our recruiters, said he sometimes gets phone messages that are so garbled and difficult to understand, he is unable get enough information to call them back.

“At least once or twice a week I get a voicemail message where I can’t understand their name and phone number,” he said. “I know looking for a job can be stressful and you’re just following up, but I can’t call you back or give you the information you’re looking for if I don’t know who you are or how to contact you.”

He said it is important to be concise, speak slowly and make sure there is no background interference. It is a good idea to state your name at the beginning of the message, give the purpose of your call and provide your number, then close by repeating your name and number. If you have an uncommon name, spelling it out helps the person you are calling find your information.

He added if there is one time you want to make sure someone has your information right, it is probably going to be when they want to offer you a job. You can also give the job title and posting number to help the recruiter identity the position you are referring to.

“We each recruit for a dozen positions at any time, so while we might recognize your name, we might not remember which position you applied for,” he said. “And if you haven’t already applied, let us know that too so we don’t go looking for your application only to find you’re not in our system yet.”

Have any tricks on not playing phone tag? Or suggestions on the information you wish people would leave you in a voicemail? Let us know in the comments below.

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